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Old 01-12-2004, 08:35 AM
  #21  
The Brickyard Rat
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I thought about the 17 inchers, 350ed. Problem is I've really got sucked into the look of the 18s so will have to do what I can with suspension componets.

By the way, "mum's" the word on the 17 vs 18 if any one meets my wifey!!! She just doesn't get it on sacrificing a few bumps for a really great look! LOL!
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Old 01-20-2004, 12:21 AM
  #22  
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Is a spring compressor needed to do a coilover install?
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Old 01-21-2004, 02:12 PM
  #23  
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Originally posted by The Brickyard Rat
Good idea, Mike.

Though I occassionly put the metal all the way down & enjoy the twisty-turneys as much as others, my primary use of the Zzzz is as a cruisor. Add that I want my wife & I to take more/longer trips in the Zzz which means encountering more roads causing a bumpy ride......a condition wifey does not like.

Question: What can I do to give the Zzzz a more luxury car style ride? (Besides trading the wife in on a "sportier" model who will not fuss......LOL!).

I'm not going to be taking the Brick to the outer edge of performance limits so I don't mind giving up preformance for a more comfortable ride.
Before I bought the Z, I would have considered this suggestion a sacrilege. You may want to go to Grand Touring tires. Having the Tire Rack's consumer survey for illustration reveals some interesting things. Some of the GT tires rate as highly as the "Summer" tires. I just noticed this phenomenon after breaking in my wife's new 2004 Acura TL on a 900+ mile trip. Driving through the twisting, turning roads of NW Arkansas on Bridgestone's top GT tire, the Turanza Z rated all seasons, the TL performed as well as the Z did on a previous trip several months ago and the ride is outstanding. There is nothing mushy or sloppy on the TL's suspension either, just a well tuned sports tourer setup.

Of course for the Z, those tires would not take the place of a good suspension match and I have already pre-ordered Konis matched to my springs, etc., but I will consider the GT all season tires when the Michelin A/Ss wear out. Just a thought, I bought the Z as a fun travel car and it worked reasonably well away from home, but my roads are too poor to tolerate the stock setup. After the Konis are installed, we will take the Z on shorter trips, 2 or 3 days at a time, and I have no regrets turning it into more of a Tourer, the stock setup is intolerable.
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Old 02-13-2004, 04:53 PM
  #24  
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Originally posted by Resolute
I hope someone else will comment or review on their experience with a softer suspension set-up, as unfortunately I cannot. However, I might help you with some things to consider as you shop around.
In order to change the ride feel of a vehicle, the optimum factor for tuning to a person's preference begins with the car's suspension frequency. The suspension frequency is the rate at which the spring will travel it's full cycle- compression to extension and back to neutral - in a given amount of time. This rate is measured in CPS, or cycles per second. The higher the frequency, the stiffer the ride, and ultimately the better handling potential of the vehicle. Several factors affect a suspension's frequency but, since luxury is what we're after over ultimate performance, it is the spring rate that is most important. A lighter spring will lower the CPS of the suspension. For the 350Z, a 400 in-lbs or less spring should be desirable. This will, with a good damper, better absorb the impacts of road irregularities and lessen the force transmitted to the chassis. This will unfortunately also allow more body roll. To help keep a sporty feel and good handling characteristics, a lighter spring should be accompanied by a well-matched anti-roll bar and damper assembly. It is an option to match the stock damper with an aftermarket spring alone, however, the simple fact is that it is harder to match a spring to a damper than it is to design a damper for the spring. In other words, 9 out of 10 times, a reputable system that includes a damper will give a more comfortable ride and better performance than just a spring that was designed for the stock damper. There are, undoubtably, springs alone that would perform better than the stock set-up for a softer ride, but would be hard pressed to beat a softer coil-over design that has been properly tuned. If the design also includes ant-roll bars to match, then a complete package would be the odds favorite for the ultimate in a comfortable yet well handling design. Finally, for a smoother, less disturbing ride, pay attention to the mounts and bushings offered with the kit. Hard materials like polyurethane or nylon will transmit more force to the chassis than stock rubber mounts, and pillow-ball mounts should be avoided at all cost. A well-designed coil-over like the Tein CS might be a good place for you to start looking. I believe Tein posts their spring rates and ride height information, along with pictures, for this unit. www.tein.com
Has anyone installed Tein dampers? Not the coilovers, but the H-tech or S-tech or Luxury Masters. If you have, please give us your impressions and the details of the install. Did you already have non-stock springs, linear or progressive? What differences can you detect? Do you like them or do you plan to add swaybars too?
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Old 02-17-2004, 09:43 AM
  #25  
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Originally posted by Resolute
I hope someone else will comment or review on their experience with a softer suspension set-up, as unfortunately I cannot. However, I might help you with some things to consider as you shop around.
In order to change the ride feel of a vehicle, the optimum factor for tuning to a person's preference begins with the car's suspension frequency. The suspension frequency is the rate at which the spring will travel it's full cycle- compression to extension and back to neutral - in a given amount of time. This rate is measured in CPS, or cycles per second. The higher the frequency, the stiffer the ride, and ultimately the better handling potential of the vehicle. Several factors affect a suspension's frequency but, since luxury is what we're after over ultimate performance, it is the spring rate that is most important. A lighter spring will lower the CPS of the suspension. For the 350Z, a 400 in-lbs or less spring should be desirable. This will, with a good damper, better absorb the impacts of road irregularities and lessen the force transmitted to the chassis. This will unfortunately also allow more body roll. To help keep a sporty feel and good handling characteristics, a lighter spring should be accompanied by a well-matched anti-roll bar and damper assembly. It is an option to match the stock damper with an aftermarket spring alone, however, the simple fact is that it is harder to match a spring to a damper than it is to design a damper for the spring. In other words, 9 out of 10 times, a reputable system that includes a damper will give a more comfortable ride and better performance than just a spring that was designed for the stock damper. There are, undoubtably, springs alone that would perform better than the stock set-up for a softer ride, but would be hard pressed to beat a softer coil-over design that has been properly tuned. If the design also includes ant-roll bars to match, then a complete package would be the odds favorite for the ultimate in a comfortable yet well handling design. Finally, for a smoother, less disturbing ride, pay attention to the mounts and bushings offered with the kit. Hard materials like polyurethane or nylon will transmit more force to the chassis than stock rubber mounts, and pillow-ball mounts should be avoided at all cost. A well-designed coil-over like the Tein CS might be a good place for you to start looking. I believe Tein posts their spring rates and ride height information, along with pictures, for this unit. www.tein.com

Stock spring rates
F/R in lb/in
350Z and G35 coupe: 347/419 (remember the inboad location of the rear springs to the wheels and effective wheel rates)

Tein CS coilovers
350Z/G35 Coupe & Sedan
F/R spring rates Linear springs
392/392
+14% front -5% rear (19% transfer to front)

If 448lbs springs are run in the rear, front to rear balance
to OEM changes to: ($165 addtional cost to purchase seperately)
350Z/G35 Coupe +14 front +7% rear (7% transfer to front)
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Old 02-22-2004, 11:44 PM
  #26  
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i hope this isn't a dumb question but i know very little about suspensions.
i want to know what the difference is between getting coilovers and getting aftermarket shocks and springs? what are the pros and cons of each system?
also into which category would the nismo s-tune suspension?

tia,
Rajiv
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Old 04-26-2004, 08:52 AM
  #27  
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What are the best front and rear dampening settings for full coilover systems in the following applications:

1. 1/4 mile
2. Autocross
3. Daily driving

Thanks.
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Old 05-19-2004, 04:30 PM
  #28  
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How do you adjust ride height in rear coilovers since the spring and strut are separate?
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Old 05-25-2004, 02:10 AM
  #29  
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Default my suspension

Tein Flex Coil Overs with Electronic Damping Force Control
Nismo S-tune Swaybars
Crawford front strut brace

very happy with it
Attached Thumbnails Developing a FAQ page for Suspension-350z-side-above-cropped.jpg  
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Old 06-10-2004, 06:04 AM
  #30  
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Q: Assuming that the NNA's toe-in solution for the feathering problem does not work, has there been any confirmed solution (via coilovers or spring kits) that resolves tire feathering?

[I'm just making the assumption, that long term we're all going to be dealing with the feathering. Sorry if this is a tad off topic, it does related to suspensions though...]
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Old 06-26-2004, 11:42 AM
  #31  
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Q: How much does it usually cost to install the coilover? I got quoted for $350 for installing Hypermax, expensive?
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Old 06-29-2004, 11:08 AM
  #32  
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Q: can someone breakdown the TEIN product line for the 350Z?
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Old 08-03-2004, 08:07 AM
  #33  
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Basic, CS, & Flex for the coilovers
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Old 08-04-2004, 11:17 AM
  #34  
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what is the difference between the 1 way, 1.5 way and 2 way lsd?
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Old 09-02-2004, 02:16 AM
  #35  
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Originally posted by Jung918
what is the difference between the 1 way, 1.5 way and 2 way lsd?

A 1 way LSD will provide differential lock under forward acceleration only. It will act like a free dif under deceleration.

A 2 way LSD will provide differential lock in both acceleration and deceleration

A 1.5 way LSD will provide full differential lock under acceleration (like a 1 way LSD) and will provide a lesser degree of lock during deceleration
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Old 09-06-2004, 05:17 AM
  #36  
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Default VDC?

how does VDC actually work?
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Old 10-14-2004, 03:11 PM
  #37  
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bump on DJK's question.
and how exactly does changing the damper settings affect the cars handling characteristics?
e.g. softening rear induces more oversteer? etc.
I need the actual physics explaination plz. :]


Originally posted by ___DJK___
What are the best front and rear dampening settings for full coilover systems in the following applications:

1. 1/4 mile
2. Autocross
3. Daily driving

Thanks.
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Old 11-04-2004, 05:11 AM
  #38  
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Default Helpful info

Gsedan35 posted this over on 6mt.net:


Below is a much updated data base list for coilovers, I've added a number of new products, or products that I discovered specs for. I've done this to help myself out as I ponder what to get and to help the CVP35/V35/Z33 community out.

What it tells you,
1. How much stiffer then oem each products springs are in percentage, this way you can get the stiffness you want or see where to avoid too much stiffness.
2. Tracks how the cars handling might be effected by a transfer of roll stiffness (watch out for large transfers).
3. Tells you as much as possible, the design and features offered.
4. Gives you special notes concerning details you might want to include in any buying decision.

What to buy depends on what you want once the product is installed, as in comfort, sport, track, or race. How do you feel about brand name, the trust factor. What price point are you comfortable with. And should you pay extra for features you may want to have down the road in the future.

Oem springs
Front:314 Rear:342

Tein Flex (twin tube construction, adjustable dampners
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
672/672 F+114% R+98
Transfers +16% roll stiffness to front
Side Note: Extremely high spring rates mean even when the adjustable damping is set as low as possible, you may not find ride quality happiness, several reports of this setups harshness exist Yet a few owner comment’s of a “like stock ride quality” also exist. However given the fact that they use a spring stiffness that’s over 100% stiffer then oem, if ride quality is of concern, either hitch a ride in a car equipped with them or make a different choice. In addition, several review’s have been done by people actually having the original more softly sprung Tein Flex coilovers do not take their comments to mean the same as the one using the current product, the original product specs are listed below under Tein Flex JDM.

Tein Flex JDM specs (can be special ordered est 6-8 weeks delivery)
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
560/560 F+78% R+64%
Transfers 14% roll stiffness to front
Side Note: This is the original specs first offered in the U.S. with the Flex, shortly after it’s introduction the specs changed to those listed further above (672/672)


Tein Basic (twin tube construction, non adjustable dampners )
504/504 F+61% R+43%
Transfers +18% roll stiffness to front
Side Note: Excellent value at it’s price point, some very good reviews have been done by users of this coilover system.

Tein SS (twin tube construction, adjustable dampners )
(JDM only at this time. 6-8 weeks delivery, come via ship)
392/314-392 (rear’s are progressive)
F+25% R+15% at peak


Tein CS (Monotube constructionad, adjustable dampners )
Side Note: A comfort ride system compare to HKS LS
392/392 F+25% R15%
Transfers +10% roll stiffness to front
Special Note: I had a conversation with Tein about this coilover. I called because I had a hunch that the comfort tuning designed into the system would prevent me from getting the dampning stiffness I wanted. When I told him I wanted a system that would be valved stiffer then oem 350Z shocks, he did not believe they were setup to do that. Revalving them would be $300 or so PER! dampner.


Buddy Club Racing Spec coilovers (Monotube construction, adjustable dampning)
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
748/280*
(very likely run's rear springs on the dampner body and not at the oem rear spring location)

Jic Flta-2 350Z fitment (Monotube construction, adjustable dampning)
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
Special Note: This setup is known for it’s street ride harshness, but also for track performance
560/672 F+78% R+98%
Transfers +20% roll stiffness to rear

Jic Flta-2 G35 coupe (Monotube, adjustable dampning)
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
560/560 F+78% R+64% $1750
Transfers 14% roll stiffness to front

Jic Flta-2 G35 sedan (Monotube, adjustable dampning)
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
504/392 F+61% R+15%
Transfers +46% roll stiffness to front

Cusco Zero 1&2 (Monotube?, 1=non adjustable dampner, 2=adjustable dampner)
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
560/392 F+78% R+15%
Transfers +63% roll stiffness to front (no they do not run their rear springs on the dampner body, oem location, seen them on the car with my own eyes.)
Side Note: Thats a awful lot of spring stiffness to move to the front

Bilstein PSS coil over (Monotube construction, non adjustable dampners)
Special Note: Mild spring rates, but Bilstein says the dampners are performance valved
370/240-420 (rear progressive) F +18% R +23% (at peak rear spring rate)
Transfers +5% roll stiffness to rear
Special Note: Very easy to ditch the rear progressive springs that come with the Bilsteins (I would) Eibach sell's linear 5" O.D. springs that you can swap in, $100 for the pair.

Bilstein PSS9 coilover (Monotube construction, adjustable dampners)
Special Note: Mild spring rates, but Bilstein says the dampners are performance valved
370/240-420 (rear progressive) F +18% R +23% (at peak rear spring rate)
Transfers +5% roll stiffness to rear
Special Note: Very easy to ditch the rear progressive springs that come with the Bilsteins (I would) Eibach sell's linear 5" O.D. springs that you can swap in, $100 for the pair.


ATTENTION! HKS will be opening a U.S. service center very shortly, allowing for service and repair on their coilovers here, without sending them to Japan.

HKS LS+ G35 Coupe (Monotube construction, adjustable dampners)
504/448 +58%front +29% (rear springs are progressive)
transfers 29% roll stiffness to the front
Side Note: Tuned more aggressively then the LS.
Special Note: This G35 coupe version, while transfering roll stiffness to the front vs the same 350Z version, does actually use stiffer valving in it's dampners then the Z version.

HKS LS+ 350Z (Monotube construction, adjustable dampners)
448/448 43%front +31%
transfers 12% roll stiffness to the front
Side Note: Tuned more aggressively then the LS, but not to the RS level, in spite of the RS actually using softer spring rates. Special Note: This 350Z version does not transfer as much roll stiffness to the front as the G35 version, but does use softer valving specs in it's dampners.

HKS LS G35 (Monotube construction, non adjustable dampners)
448/336 F +43% R -1%
transfers 44% roll stiffness to the front
Special Note: A comfort ride system, compare to Tein CS coilover

HKS LS 350z (Monotube construction, non adjustable dampners)
448/448 F43% R+31%
transfers 12% roll stiffness to the front
Special Note: A comfort ride system, spring rates make better sense then same G35 application, compare to Tein CS

HKS II (Monotube construction, adjustable dampners)
504/504 F+61% R+47%
transfers 14% roll stiffness to the front
Special Note: sprung and valved to be HKS’s most aggressive product, it is a notch above the RS coil over on the track, compare to Tein Flex and Jic coilovers

HKS RS (Monotube construction, adjustable dampning)
448/448 F+43% R+31%
Transfers 12% roll stiffness to the front
Special Note: “Marketed” as HKS’s track coil over with a good street ride, it is more aggressive then the HKS LS+ and does not transfer as much spring stiffness to the front.

Zeal function V6 coilover (Monotube construction, adjustable dampner) $2855
Full-length adjustment and height adjustment for separate setting of the height and spring preload
560/448 F+78% R+31%
Transfers +47% roll stiffness to front

KW coilovers Variant's 1,2&3
Monotube construction, V1=non adjustable dampning, V2=adjustable damping, V3=separate adjustability for compression damping AND rebound damping and is the only product of it’s kind at this time.
Front: 485lbs to 525Lbs Rear: 240Lbs to 548Lbs (progressive springs)

D2 Racing Coilovers (Monotube)
840/728 F+168% R+113% (wee bit stiff eh, the recommended rate to)
Transfers 55% roll stiffness to front
Side Note: Only known application of this coilover was by a vendor wishing to sell it, upon installation it was determined that the ride quality was so poor that they were pulled from the car and any idea of carrying the product was shelved.



Kg/mm DNA coilovers (Monotube construction, adjustable dampners)
840/280*+
JDM only at this time, $2700+
These look like they are made by buddy club.
*They use rear springs on the rear coil over bodies AND a progressive spring in the oem location. The best I can get translating is that the progressive spring add’s 200lbs to the rear rate.
and a small update by him:

Opps, the HKS RS should not say as a point of fact that they are valved stiffer then the LS+ (especially the G35 coupe version). I have not seen valving specs on the RS like I have with the other HKS products. I'm repeating what HKS said when I called and spoke to them. I would feel a lot better to actually see the specs however.
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Old 11-04-2004, 10:46 PM
  #39  
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Q: If I get new coilovers, when do I need to also get a camber kit?
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Old 02-19-2005, 04:18 PM
  #40  
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Default Re: my suspension

Originally posted by Egbert Souse
Tein Flex Coil Overs with Electronic Damping Force Control
Nismo S-tune Swaybars
Crawford front strut brace

very happy with it
Recently installed Hotchkis sway bars and the lean or roll issues have almost gone away. Vast improvement. No clunking sound, but I only have about 200 miles with them. In April I am going with Tein Flex Coil Overs with the associated EDFC unit, which should be very cool to say the least. NISMO is just too expensive, but their products are very good. I am going to stay with the stock 17" wheels/tires. Freeway system out here in N. Cal is terrible. I just cannot see installing 18 or 19" wheels. VOLK makes a hell-of-a wheel, but I am afraid of doing some kind of damage to the tire, wheel, my car or some other freeway crazy out there. Already I have seen a couple of Z's with front tire tire failure. Both had 19" wheels and both had left front tire failures, probably hitting a stupid pot hole on the freeway, but who knows. After installation I will post a report on how the TEIN Flex Coil Over System is doing. Thanks for your update...rich, San Jose, Ca
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